theliftingyogi:

I had to lose 80 lbs and hit the lowest point of my life mentally, then gain 20 ish lbs before I really truly loved my body. This is easier said then done somedays but I try to always appreciate myself for who I am as a person and not just my weight.

When I was at my lowest weight I could barely look at myself naked. Now I look at this and think “shit, I’m cute”, rolls and all. 

Because of this extra skin I may never have a six pack but its made me who I am. I’m  flawless.

theliftingyogi:

I had to lose 80 lbs and hit the lowest point of my life mentally, then gain 20 ish lbs before I really truly loved my body. This is easier said then done somedays but I try to always appreciate myself for who I am as a person and not just my weight.

When I was at my lowest weight I could barely look at myself naked. Now I look at this and think “shit, I’m cute”, rolls and all.

Because of this extra skin I may never have a six pack but its made me who I am. I’m flawless.

(via brattylifts)

godtie:

i am so pro-selfie

you take those selfies.

you take those selfies and look cute as heck

you take those selfies and build your self confidence

because you are cute as heck and you deserve to be confident in yourself because youre an awesome person

if anyone says any differently they are a rotten cabbage who doesnt know anything

now go take more selfies so i can reblog them and talk about how gosh darn cute you are

(via theathleticaestheticblog)

I didn't like crossfit. I felt like you already had to be pretty fit to do anything. It felt like gym class- everything was timed and I was constantly one of the last people to finish. I didn't catch on to the lifts because other people had been doing it for years and I had just joined so the trainers weren't really up for reteaching I guess. My PRs sucked and I know I shouldn't have been hard on myself because I just joined but still. I wish I would've enjoyed it because it seemed cool :/

crossfit-cupcake:

Aw I’m sorry you felt like that, bb! I do feel like in crossfit (or any other sport for that matter) you’ve gotta allow yourself to be a beginner, though. Starting cf is one of the most humbling things because no matter how great your strengths are, there are so many new weaknesses and things that you just can’t do. Personally when I started I was consistently one of the last to finish and using some of the lowest weights. For example, just like 2 weeks after I started CF, our gym did an event where everyone did the workout “Grace” (30 clean and jerks for time). The Rx weight was 95#. I only used 55# and was -still- one of the last girls to finish. But instead of beating myself up I reminded myself that I’m a beginner and I’m learning. I decided that by that time next year I wanted to be able to do that workout Rx, no matter how slow. Now, 8 months later, I have done Grace with 95# quite a few times, like all those girls I was watching kill it back then, and even did it with 105# once! I guess my point is, at first, it’s pretty likely that you will be one of the last to finish. But that’s where EVERYONE starts from, and there is so far to grow from there if people decide that’s what they want to do.

Crossfit’s definitely not for everyone, so I’m not trying to argue against your decision that you didn’t like it, not at all! But I did kind of want to use this as an encouragement that everyone starts out as a beginner and there’s no reason to feel bad about that. :) ❤️❤️

However if your coaches truly didn’t “feel like” teaching you the movements just because you’re new you were NOT at a good crossfit gym and I agree with your decision to leave. A good gym should have an introductory program to teach the beginners specifically, and they should never make you feel bad for asking for extra help to learn the lifts even once you’re in the regular class. That’s what they’re getting paid for. A good crossfit gym will also gladly help you scale a workout to match your ability as well so that everybody’s doing a workout that works with their level of fitness. So if that’s not the case I would say that definitely is not the right place to be. xx

Such a good morning. Such a good breakfast 🍉💕😍 I LOVE LOVE LOVE this foggy weather. I hope it rains. The air smells so good and I’m so cozy with a vanilla candle going, full from my yummy breakfast and reading my new book with Eli curled up by my side. So thankful.

Such a good morning. Such a good breakfast 🍉💕😍 I LOVE LOVE LOVE this foggy weather. I hope it rains. The air smells so good and I’m so cozy with a vanilla candle going, full from my yummy breakfast and reading my new book with Eli curled up by my side. So thankful.

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

(via alayshaiifts)

Men always say that as the defining compliment: the Cool Girl. She’s a cool girl. Being the Cool Girl means that I am a hot, brilliant, funny woman who adores football, poker, dirty jokes, and burping, who plays video games, drinks cheap beer, loves threesomes and anal sex, and jams hot dogs and hamburgers into her mouth like she’s hosting the world’s biggest culinary gang bang while somehow maintaining a size 2, because Cool Girls are above all hot. Hot and understanding. Cool Girls never get angry; they only smile in a chagrined, loving manner and let their men do whatever they want. Go ahead, shit on me, I don’t mind, I’m the Cool Girl.
Men actually think this girl exists. Maybe they’re fooled because so many women are willing to pretend to be this girl. For a long time Cool Girl offended me. I used to see these men - friends, coworkers, strangers - giddy over these awful pretender women, and I’d want to sit these men down and calmly say: You are not dating a woman, you are dating a woman who has watched too many movies written by socially awkward men who’d like to believe that this kind of woman exists and might kiss them. I’d want to grab the poor guy by his lapels or messenger bag and say: The bitch doesn’t really love chili dogs that much - no one loves chili dogs that much! And the Cool Girls are even more pathetic: They’re not even pretending to be the woman they want to be, they’re pretending to be the woman a man wants them to be. Oh, and if you’re not a Cool Girl, I beg you not to believe that your man doesn’t want the Cool Girl. It may be a slightly different version - maybe he’s a vegetarian, so Cool Girl loves seitan and is great with dogs; or maybe he’s a hipster artist, so Cool Girl is a tattooed, bespectacled nerd who loves comics. There are variations to the window dressing, but believe me, he wants Cool Girl, who is basically the girl who likes every fucking thing he likes and doesn’t ever complain. (How do you know you’re not Cool Girl? Because he says things like: ‘I like strong women.’ If he says that to you, he will at some point fuck someone else. Because ‘I like strong women’ is code for ‘I hate strong women.’)
I waited patiently - years - for the pendulum to swing the other way, for men to start reading Jane Austen, learn how to knit, pretend to like cosmos, organize scrapbook parties, and make out with each other while we leer. And then we’d say, Yeah, he’s a Cool Guy.
But it never happened. Instead, women across the nation colluded in our degradation! Pretty soon Cool Girl became the standard girl. Men believed she existed - she wasn’t just a dreamgirl one in a million. Every girl was supposed to be this girl, and if you weren’t, then there was something wrong with you.

Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn. (via the-library-and-step-on-it)

(via alayshaiifts)

organicallygorgeous:

[ This post was created for students completing their final years of high school BUT can be applied for any level of schooling/ university/ college. My sister & I put together our best tips and what helped us achieve high marks. Sami got an ATAR of 97.6 and I got an ATAR of 94.4, placing us in the top 3% and 5% of the state. I hope this helps!] 
1. Choose the Right Subjects.  - Pick the subjects that you enjoy. There is a misconception that only the traditional high-scaling subjects such as Math Ext 2/ Chemistry/ Physics will allow one to get a high ATAR, however this cannot be further from the truth.
- Both Sami & I did humanities based subjects without maths or science, along with many top earning students. What is more important is how well you do in a subject, rather than the subject itself. You are more inclined to perform well in something you enjoy, so choose wisely.  - Don’t be swayed with what those around you say- it’s you who will be spending two years completing the subject so it’s imperative that you’re doing what’s best for YOU. Think about your strengths, what you want to do in the future, and what you think you will enjoy.
2. Create a Routine.
- Figure out what type of person you are: do you like to wake up in the morning to start your day early, or do you prefer to study once everyone is asleep? I used to wake up early to get study done in the morning and sleep at 10pm each night, while Sami didn’t start studying until mid-evening and finish around 12-1pm.  - Once you know what you prefer, structure your time to allow the most out of your day. Make a timetable like THIS, and set aside time for relaxing, eating, studying and a set bed-time each night. This will allow you to achieve balance in your day, train your mind into effortlessly switching to different modes, and decrease anxiety to make time for everything.  - Don’t leave anything to chance or ‘I’ll do it later/when I feel like it’ approach. Be pro-active and MAKE time for this.
3. Have a Study Space.
- Have a study space reserved solely for study. I would find a space in home where it is quiet, preferably has natural lighting, where you can put all your textbooks, folders, and study things. I would avoid using your bed to study as you’re more likely to drift off. - If there isn’t such place in your home, consider going to a local library after school to do your homework/assignments.  - Tell everyone in your home: “This is my study space. GTFO.”
4. Be Organised and Plan.
- Have different folders/exercise books/ binders etc for each different subject or even multiple things for different subjects, such as a folder for homework, class work, assignments.  - After each day or week, organise your work into these categories so when it comes to exam or assignment time, you can easily find what you are looking for.  - Consider the use of dividers, colour-coding, plastic sleeves, post-it notes, whatever is necessary to keep you organised. Don’t waste time searching for things. Clutter in your life will result in clutter in your mind, and will put you off study.  - Invest in a planner of some sort, may it be a daily planner, wall calendar, desk calendar, phone calendar, whatever you prefer. This is where you put exam dates, assignment due dates, extra-curricular activities. Fail to plan = plan to fail!
5. Make Notes Regularly.
- After each topic, make notes of what they key information is. This is important when it comes to exam time, and you have already done the work throughout the year! It’s also a great way to learn the information and keep it fresh in your mind.  - Experiment to find out what works best for you: perhaps you prefer handwriting the notes, or typing on your laptop, or recording notes & playing it back on your music player. Try out everything.  - Share notes with your friends. This will fill in the blanks of your work, and get a wider range of perspectives.  - Once your notes are made, organise them using the abovementioned organisation methods! Your future self will thank you. 
 6. Do Practise Papers & Use Your Teachers 
- Doing practise papers is an extremely effective method of testing and enhancing your exam ability. 50% of your final ATAR is a timed exam, usually 3 hours. These exams are stressful and not only examine how well you know the content, but also how well you can convey this knowledge in the timespan. By practising past questions in the allocated time, you improve the legibility of your writing and your capability to think under pressure. After practising questions, get it marked by teachers/ tutors. You’ll see what your strengths/ weaknesses are and focus solely on improving them. 
- Establishing a relationship with your teachers will be very beneficial for you. It’s their job to teach you, help you and mentor you. Don’t be scared to ask them questions and to help you succeed. Ask them to review your work, what you should improve on, hand in drafts etc. They will be marking your work and they know what is required in assignments and exams. 
7. Do Your Homework
- No matter how small it is, or how insignificant, make a habit of always completing your homework. This will help you revise the content at the same time and stay on top of your work. Doing your homework can also substitute for study for the day. It is also a good way to see holes in your understanding. 
8. Have a Goal 
- Don’t go through the HSC (or any year of schooling) without goals that you want to achieve. These goals determine your effort, your preparation, your outlook. Whether it be to get an ATAR of 99 or 75, write it out and aim for it. 
- Break this big goal into little daily, weekly and monthly goals. A daily goal could be “Finish all my homework and start on the assignment.” A weekly goal can be “Finish half of the assignment.” A monthly goal can be “Finish a quarter of the major work.” 
- Whilst the big goal may seem overwhelming, breaking it into little goals/ daily & weekly to-do lists makes it all achievable. Take it in baby-steps. 
9. Study SMARTER, Not Harder
- People often think that to get a great mark, you have to study for hours on end, and have no social life but this is definitely not the case. What is important is HOW and WHEN you study, not how much. 
- By being organised, doing your homework, planning ahead, setting time aside, and figuring out what is the best method of note-taking for you, you’re already more effective than someone who blindly re-writes the textbook. 
- Some great methods to retain information include: teaching someone the content, using diagrams, acronyms, pictures, stories etc, whatever helps you understand the content. 
-  Every night, revise what you have learnt that day, and transfer this information into your notes. Every week, revise that past week’s information and at the end of that topic, do a more thorough review. 
- Understand the CONCEPTS. Make sure you’re at the stage where you can TEACH this to someone who has no idea. You should study so that when you’re in an exam, you can transfer knowledge to any question. This is why you should avoid memorising an essay blindly, as the examiners can ask you anything and you are marked on your understanding, not your ability to re-write.  
10. Balancing Social Life + Being Healthy. - The HSC does not mean you have to give anything up. It just means you have to balance all aspects of your life better. There is no reason for you to give up what you enjoy. If you implement the organisation methods, create yourself a routine, study smarter then there is no reason you can’t enjoy time with your friends and family.  -  Having time to do what you enjoy and relax you is so important. Take a day or afternoon or morning off each week to get your mind off school/uni and focus 1000% on you.  - Create a support system of people you can speak to when you get stressed and overwhelmed. If you’re not coping, reach out to someone whom you can talk to. - Getting fresh air, eating well and getting enough sleep is SO important. Make sure you’re nourishing yourself with fresh food and enough exercise. Even 15 minutes of fresh air makes a massive difference.  - If you’re constantly struggling to stay awake in class, make changes in your day. Establish a bed-time and avoid wasting too much time on social media. - Aim for balance in all aspects of your life and take a deep breath.OTHER LINKS: 
> How To Take Notes / General Study Tips 
> How to Stay Motivated
> How to Balance Life & Plan  
> How to Stop Procrastinating
> Full Study Tips Page
I hope this helps & I wish you all the very best in your studies!

organicallygorgeous:

[ This post was created for students completing their final years of high school BUT can be applied for any level of schooling/ university/ college. My sister & I put together our best tips and what helped us achieve high marks. Sami got an ATAR of 97.6 and I got an ATAR of 94.4, placing us in the top 3% and 5% of the state. I hope this helps!] 

1. Choose the Right Subjects.
- Pick the subjects that you enjoy. There is a misconception that only the traditional high-scaling subjects such as Math Ext 2/ Chemistry/ Physics will allow one to get a high ATAR, however this cannot be further from the truth.

- Both Sami & I did humanities based subjects without maths or science, along with many top earning students. What is more important is how well you do in a subject, rather than the subject itself. You are more inclined to perform well in something you enjoy, so choose wisely.

- Don’t be swayed with what those around you say- it’s you who will be spending two years completing the subject so it’s imperative that you’re doing what’s best for YOU. Think about your strengths, what you want to do in the future, and what you think you will enjoy.

2. Create a Routine.

- Figure out what type of person you are: do you like to wake up in the morning to start your day early, or do you prefer to study once everyone is asleep? I used to wake up early to get study done in the morning and sleep at 10pm each night, while Sami didn’t start studying until mid-evening and finish around 12-1pm.

- Once you know what you prefer, structure your time to allow the most out of your day. Make a timetable like THIS, and set aside time for relaxing, eating, studying and a set bed-time each night. This will allow you to achieve balance in your day, train your mind into effortlessly switching to different modes, and decrease anxiety to make time for everything.

- Don’t leave anything to chance or ‘I’ll do it later/when I feel like it’ approach. Be pro-active and MAKE time for this.

3. Have a Study Space.

- Have a study space reserved solely for study. I would find a space in home where it is quiet, preferably has natural lighting, where you can put all your textbooks, folders, and study things. I would avoid using your bed to study as you’re more likely to drift off.

- If there isn’t such place in your home, consider going to a local library after school to do your homework/assignments.

- Tell everyone in your home: “This is my study space. GTFO.”

4. Be Organised and Plan.

- Have different folders/exercise books/ binders etc for each different subject or even multiple things for different subjects, such as a folder for homework, class work, assignments.

- After each day or week, organise your work into these categories so when it comes to exam or assignment time, you can easily find what you are looking for.

- Consider the use of dividers, colour-coding, plastic sleeves, post-it notes, whatever is necessary to keep you organised. Don’t waste time searching for things. Clutter in your life will result in clutter in your mind, and will put you off study.

- Invest in a planner of some sort, may it be a daily planner, wall calendar, desk calendar, phone calendar, whatever you prefer. This is where you put exam dates, assignment due dates, extra-curricular activities. Fail to plan = plan to fail!

5. Make Notes Regularly.

- After each topic, make notes of what they key information is. This is important when it comes to exam time, and you have already done the work throughout the year! It’s also a great way to learn the information and keep it fresh in your mind.

- Experiment to find out what works best for you: perhaps you prefer handwriting the notes, or typing on your laptop, or recording notes & playing it back on your music player. Try out everything.

- Share notes with your friends. This will fill in the blanks of your work, and get a wider range of perspectives.

- Once your notes are made, organise them using the abovementioned organisation methods! Your future self will thank you. 

 6. Do Practise Papers & Use Your Teachers 

- Doing practise papers is an extremely effective method of testing and enhancing your exam ability. 50% of your final ATAR is a timed exam, usually 3 hours. These exams are stressful and not only examine how well you know the content, but also how well you can convey this knowledge in the timespan. By practising past questions in the allocated time, you improve the legibility of your writing and your capability to think under pressure. After practising questions, get it marked by teachers/ tutors. You’ll see what your strengths/ weaknesses are and focus solely on improving them. 

- Establishing a relationship with your teachers will be very beneficial for you. It’s their job to teach you, help you and mentor you. Don’t be scared to ask them questions and to help you succeed. Ask them to review your work, what you should improve on, hand in drafts etc. They will be marking your work and they know what is required in assignments and exams. 

7. Do Your Homework

- No matter how small it is, or how insignificant, make a habit of always completing your homework. This will help you revise the content at the same time and stay on top of your work. Doing your homework can also substitute for study for the day. It is also a good way to see holes in your understanding. 

8. Have a Goal 

- Don’t go through the HSC (or any year of schooling) without goals that you want to achieve. These goals determine your effort, your preparation, your outlook. Whether it be to get an ATAR of 99 or 75, write it out and aim for it. 

- Break this big goal into little daily, weekly and monthly goals. A daily goal could be “Finish all my homework and start on the assignment.” A weekly goal can be “Finish half of the assignment.” A monthly goal can be “Finish a quarter of the major work.” 

- Whilst the big goal may seem overwhelming, breaking it into little goals/ daily & weekly to-do lists makes it all achievable. Take it in baby-steps. 

9. Study SMARTER, Not Harder

- People often think that to get a great mark, you have to study for hours on end, and have no social life but this is definitely not the case. What is important is HOW and WHEN you study, not how much. 

- By being organised, doing your homework, planning ahead, setting time aside, and figuring out what is the best method of note-taking for you, you’re already more effective than someone who blindly re-writes the textbook. 

- Some great methods to retain information include: teaching someone the content, using diagrams, acronyms, pictures, stories etc, whatever helps you understand the content. 

-  Every night, revise what you have learnt that day, and transfer this information into your notes. Every week, revise that past week’s information and at the end of that topic, do a more thorough review. 

- Understand the CONCEPTS. Make sure you’re at the stage where you can TEACH this to someone who has no idea. You should study so that when you’re in an exam, you can transfer knowledge to any question. This is why you should avoid memorising an essay blindly, as the examiners can ask you anything and you are marked on your understanding, not your ability to re-write.  

10. Balancing Social Life + Being Healthy.

- The HSC does not mean you have to give anything up. It just means you have to balance all aspects of your life better. There is no reason for you to give up what you enjoy. If you implement the organisation methods, create yourself a routine, study smarter then there is no reason you can’t enjoy time with your friends and family.

-  Having time to do what you enjoy and relax you is so important. Take a day or afternoon or morning off each week to get your mind off school/uni and focus 1000% on you.

- Create a support system of people you can speak to when you get stressed and overwhelmed. If you’re not coping, reach out to someone whom you can talk to.

- Getting fresh air, eating well and getting enough sleep is SO important. Make sure you’re nourishing yourself with fresh food and enough exercise. Even 15 minutes of fresh air makes a massive difference.
- If you’re constantly struggling to stay awake in class, make changes in your day. Establish a bed-time and avoid wasting too much time on social media.

- Aim for balance in all aspects of your life and take a deep breath.

OTHER LINKS: 

> How To Take Notes / General Study Tips 

> How to Stay Motivated

> How to Balance Life & Plan  

> How to Stop Procrastinating

> Full Study Tips Page


I hope this helps & I wish you all the very best in your studies!

(via organicallygorgeous)